Doyle Auction House

Doyle Auction House

Shopping at Hayloft!

NEW YORK, NY -- This month’s sale at Hayloft Auctions feels like a treasure hunt. As I scrolled through the lots for the first time looking to find my favorite pieces, colorful joys kept leaping out to surprise me when I least expected them. Not only does this sale boast on old cash register (lot 453) that I would LOVE to see someone find a stylish and playful way of incorporating, but it is also host to numerous pieces of awesome Mid-Century Modern furniture (lot 73 & lot 74 – two examples), at another end of Hayloft’s delightful spectrum.

There are two pieces of art in this sale that I just love. The first is lot 25: “Man of Peace.” I think this would be brilliant in any room. Next, the little etching that makes up lot 182, and whose starting bid is a mere $10! Buying art for $10 – this is why I love Hayloft. And I think this tiny etching is quite endearing.

The miscellaneous object category is my favorite this month. The first thing that caught my eye during my scroll-through was lot 92: the old wine carafes. Just the other day, I was at a bar in Alphabet City where they had hung these from the ceiling with leather in a very artistic way – so just note that that is a possibility with this lot. The Chinese Famille Verte tulip vase (lot 100) is a funky and beautiful object, and I would describe the pair of Victorian brass lights in lot 250 just the same way (they are also pink, a favorite color of mine). The pair of faux malachite lamps in lot 146 are also beautiful and totally out of the ordinary – the kind of lamps that would bring an entire room together, if you let them have the limelight. In smaller objects, the group of Asian and other pottery articles in lot 421 makes up a lovely and impressive assortment, and I love the onyx sphere on stand (lot 396). If you’re one of those people (like me…) who believes in the power of crystals, onyx has all kinds of healing and energy-elevating powers (and this is an enormous hunk of onyx, so just imagine…).

Doyle Auction House

Doyle Auction House

Shopping at Hayloft!

NEW YORK, NY -- The sale at Hayloft Auctions this week is full of fascinating treasures, among them old toys, a tantalus disguised as a stack of books (which also doubles as a music box – lot 316), and a phrenology head made of porcelain (lot 141). On my first online walk through the sale, I stopped many times to take a closer look at objects of intrigue; ones I decided would not work in a small apartment like mine but would certainly make phenomenal objects of décor on a bookshelf in someone else’s home (the phrenology head being a prime example).

My favorite objects in this sale are pieces of furniture. The Chippendale style mahogany armchair – lot 5 – would, I think, look handsome in any living room. I like the Stanley Furniture Co. black painted chest – lot 33; a handy, unobtrusive piece for really any room, and one that wouldn’t be too difficult to paint were that a desire (although I sort of like the black). I also like the pair of faux bamboo red lacquered side tables in lot 35. While not my usual style, the Tulip chairs – lot 65 – also caught my eye. I feel that they just might work in my living room! Lastly, my very favorite piece of furniture in the sale is the Queen Anne style red painted center table, lot 365. I think it would add such a sense of fun to any room – both the shape and color are vibrant.

There are two sets of prints in the sale that I think are worth noting (along with a lot of fun paintings worth scoping out!). First, lot 258 is a set of fashion prints – I always love these because I feel like there is always more to see as you look closer, and they could be hung in truly any room. They are not attention-grabbing, but they can command one’s attention if one decides to look their way! Likewise for the set of five botanical prints – lot 366. I think these are especially fun to hang in a kitchen or a living room where live plants are present.

Doyle Auction House

Doyle Auction House

HAYLOFT AUCTIONS

NEW YORK, NY -- I have been working on a number of projects of late. And it is fun, and it is a little crazy. Mostly, it reminds me that I am not the type of person who really loves to do the same type of thing every day of the week. Rather, I enjoy running from upper Manhattan to the Bowery and to other boroughs throughout the week, and feeling lucky that I am getting paid to do the creative work that I enjoy. It is certainly an eclectic array of projects: combing through the sales at Hayloft for interesting finds, creating content for a nonprofit in the arts world, and others. Each speaks to a different interest of mine – art, femininity, design, food, some others. I am so happy that I have found this hectic means of balancing out my life.

Hayloft speaks to me because of its eclecticism, and this sale in particular certainly spoke to me of that trait. While browsing the sale, I found myself gravitating towards all kinds of things: pieces of art, old vessels, books, pieces of furniture… As usual, I gathered my favorites in a list to share with you:

I’ll start with furniture. I love lot 1, the mother-of pearl inlaid armoire. I think it is a wonderful accent piece. Next, of course (because I love all trunks, if you haven’t read my writing before), I was sucked in by the captain’s cedar storage trunk (lot 11) – the starting bid is only $25, and it is so cool! I think the elephant-form side table is so fun (lot 89); we did a photoshoot with it at Hayloft a while back, and I must say that it is quite photogenic. The Chinese red-painted altar table (lot 361) is the perfect piece to fit into any narrow New York apartment space, and I love the red color. The gunpowder glazed pottery planter, lastly (though not quite furniture), is such a fun piece – the dark grey color is beautiful (lot 295).

Doyle Auction House

Doyle Auction House

Hayloft Auctions

NEW YORK, NY -- February and March always bring the sense that one is quite ready to be done with the cold, the damp, and the dark. I can’t believe that it is still getting dim around 5:30 in the evening, when I convinced myself that that rhythm was on its way out of my life around Christmas. I always miscalculate that: in December, I must remind myself next year, there are still three months of early evenings to go.

I had the good fortune of escaping to the warmth of California and Hawaii, however, for about a week in January, and I brought my camera with me. My camera, in the counter-cultural vein of many millennials, is an old film camera (counter-intuitive as that might seem, we like to rebel against our techie reputation). It wasn’t passed down to me by a grandfather; rather, I bought it with a close friend I was traveling alongside this summer as a means to document our journey. A trusty Pentax ME, made 1980, it became our baby, and it taught us the joy of delayed gratification: it felt like Christmas when we received our long-awaited developed photos, and we loved only having one chance to line up our shot right, gauge the proper aperture, and hope the picture came out if we held steady. Soon, we learned how to develop our photos in the darkroom, another step toward recovering the long-lost art of photography, a once quite satisfying and rich process.

Bringing the camera out to California and Hawaii was lovely. I hadn’t really used the camera since the last warm fall days of October, and it felt great to handle its weight and real, manual buttons again. I started looking for shapes and spaces to capture, ones that reflected the mood of my surroundings. Building facades that caught a certain morning light, a few portraits of my sister, some black-and-white shots of some old, beautiful homes and hotels that still stand in Honolulu – these frames made up my week’s portfolio. I have yet to develop most of the film (three rolls of 36 shots), but with those carefully chosen shots I brought back more of a sense of aesthetic appreciation for my own wintry New York landscape. Of course, I might still be basking in the aura of vacation – who knows? But I think my time spent walking with my camera, looking at what made up the aesthetic of my surroundings, made me more open to beauty on even the coldest and darkest of days. I was in the garment district just last night, not typically thought of as the most beauteous part of New York, but I kept finding little glints of nostalgia, of excitement, of things I would LOVE to capture with my little camera.