Perspectives | The Pursuit of Self - published on Cook Space's Life Beyond the Recipe

Perspectives | The Pursuit of Self - published on Cook Space's Life Beyond the Recipe

I first started meditating when I was a junior in high school. The lacrosse coach at the time, Doug Worthen, had decided to share his mindfulness journey with the school, and he started an introductory course for anyone interested. At the time, mindfulness wasn’t quite the buzzword that it is now, and most of us knew nothing about it. What had drawn me to it was one of the items on Doug’s list of mindfulness benefits: self-awareness. I was obsessed with the idea of understanding the self - not in a philosophical way, but in an egotistical way. It drove me crazy that I could think of myself one way and be perceived completely differently by those around me. I wanted to understand how I was seen so that I could “fix” it somehow, so that I could make up for all that I felt I was lacking (social energy, self-confidence, charisma, everything that ‘popular’ people in high school seemed to have and I seemed to lack).

Maison May

Maison May

The History of Farm-to-Table at Maison May

What farm-to-table means, and why cooking this way is important to Maison May’s owner and head chef

Maison May has undergone quite an evolution since its origins as a full-service farm-to-table restaurant in the Brownstone under a different name, an evolution which many of its loyal customers and neighbors have witnessed and welcomed. Now a full-time café at Vanderbilt and private event space for weddings, bridal showers, birthday parties and everything in between at the Brownstone on Dekalb, it remains a farm-to-table establishment across the board.

In order to give you a well-rounded perspective on what exactly that means, we have decided to interview two people at Maison May about what farm-to-table means to them and why it is important. Catherine, Maison May’s owner, and Armando, Maison May’s chef, both have deep roots in eating and making food that comes straight from the farm – seasonal, local, natural – and they together create the menu at Maison May, sourcing food from local farms.

Maison May

Maison May

Women and Natural Wine

What natural and biodynamic wines are, and why Maison May hosts a dinner series around them

We hosted our second dinner at Maison May in a series dedicated to women & natural wine. We began this series in the fall of 2017 with the intention of discussing natural wines – what they are and why we think they should be the standard for what we put in our bodies. Having women to speak who import or make wine has been a crucial piece to this, as it shifts and refreshes a conversation within the male-dominated wine world. Our co-hostess this summer was Camille Rivière, a wine importer originally from Paris & the Loire Valley who is now based in Brooklyn, traveling frequently to France to search for wines to bring back to her clients in the US.

As soon as we had all settled into our first glasses and found our designated seats at the dinner table, Camille and Catherine introduced the evening. With a lovely familiarity and friendship between them, they introduced our second wine and explained how each of the wines was made – some differently than others, but each with care on small, biodynamic farms and without any help from chemicals. Throughout the evening, we came to understand through their stories what made these natural wines so precious and so worthy of an evening of celebration. Heaps of beautiful asparagus, white tile fish with dill sauce, and bright bowls of salad accompanied them, finished off by Armando’s famous Goat Cheese Cheese Cake.

A natural wine is a bit hard to define but should always abide by the following principles. It:

Corcoran Real Estate - The Inhabit Blog

Corcoran Real Estate - The Inhabit Blog

The New Rules for Playing with Color in Your Home

It may seem like interior design is stalled in neutral — those ubiquitous white-washed walls, neutral furniture and accents of leather, natural wood and metal. But in perusing the rich hues splashed on the pages of design magazines and Instagram feeds, it’s clear that color hasn’t really gone away. So what does color mean for interior design today — and how can we use it?

The History of Color, Examined

Color, and the many variables associated with it, have long fascinated creative types, according to “Saturated: The Allure and Science of Color,” an exhibition running through Jan. 13 at the Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum in New York City. The show explores color theory — and its evolution and application by artists and designers — via dozens of rare books pulled from the Smithsonian libraries, posters, textiles and furniture.

“The topic is one that everybody can relate to, but one we often take for granted,” says Jennifer Cohlman Bracchi, who curated the exhibition with Susan Brown. “In doing the research, I found it fascinating how many different types of people from different backgrounds became obsessed with the topic and devoted decades of their lives to trying to create the perfect color model or finding scientific color harmonies.”